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Responding to COVID-19

Online services during the COVID-19 crisis

Some of the churches holding online services on Sundays and weekdays are listed on this page. To add a church’s online offerings, email information to news@ladiocese.org

The list of resources for Holy Week and Easter is archived here.

Updates and Encouragement from Diocesan Leadership

All of the following are offered in both English and Spanish | Todo lo siguiente se ofrece en inglés y español.

Faith In Crisis: Meeting Our Financial Challenge Together

All clergy invited to Thursday, April 2 CARES Act workshop and Q&A

Health and Strength in Community VIII

Health and Strength in Community VII

Health and Strength in Community V

A letter to clergy of the Diocese of Los Angeles in the time of COVID-19

A Word on Communion to Go

Health and Strength In Community IV

Health and Strength In Community III

Health and Strength In Community II

Health and Strength in Community: A message from the Diocese of Los Angeles

An Introduction to Live Streaming

Resource Roundup

For the duration of the coronavirus emergency, occasional special issues of Resource Roundup — usually a newsletter for clergy, wardens, administrators and lay professionals in the Diocese of Los Angeles — will replace the Episcopal News Update. The Episcopal News Monthly bulletin insert will also be suspended until churches of the diocese return to their regular in-person worship. Additional resources to be considered for future issues may be emailed to news@ladiocese.org. Past issues are linked below.

May 7

May 5

April 30

April 28

April 23

April 21

April 16

April 14

April 9

April 7

April 2

March 31

March 26

March 24

March 20

Episcopal News Service

Coverage of the coronavirus crisis from Episcopal News Service is here.

Prayer, inspiration and theology

 

Presiding Bishop Curry issues ‘Word to the Church: On Our Theology of Worship’

“We find ourselves in the strange position of fasting from physical gathering for worship of almighty God, not out of sloth or disobedience, but in obedience to the Lord Jesus Christ, for whom the primacy of love for God and neighbor is the way of life,” Presiding Bishop Michael Curry writes in a letter to the Episcopal Church on March 31. Curry notes that he has issued a theological reflection — included in the letter — about how the Anglican way of worship gives guidance to the church in the time of COVID-19. The reflection, which was written with the aid of a group of theologians and scholars, “is not in any sense a set of guidelines, directives, or mandates,” Curry writes. The reflection is offered here in  English and Spanish.

 

Video: A Collect for Aid against Perils

(Book of Common Prayer)
Read by Presiding Bishop Michael Curry here

 

What Americans Are Doing Now Is Beautiful

[The Atlantic – March 19] [I]f we take a step back from the panic-buying of toilet paper, the response to COVID-19 should stand as one of the most beautiful moments in our country’s long history—a moment of shared, galvanizing national spirit that has existed in perhaps only in a handful of epochal years before, like 1776, 1861, 1933, and 1941, and, in modern times, after 9/11. Read more here.

 

From the Rt. Rev. Steven Charleston, former bishop of  Alaska:

“Now is the time for which our faith has prepared us. Now is the moment when all that we believe can be put to work.
Now we can turn to the inner resources we have been developing over these many years to face the challenge of a world in desperate need. We are not afraid of this crisis for we have been made ready for it.

We have devoted our lives to the belief that something greater than fear or disease guides human history. We have studied, prayed and grown in the Spirit. Now we come to the call to use what we believe.

Our people need hope, confidence, courage and compassion: the very things for which we have been trained. We are the calm in the midst of a storm.”

“Stand your ground and let your light so shine that others may see it and find their faith as well.”

 

Video: Let All Who Are Thirsty Come: Litany for the Coronavirus Pandemic

By Mel Soriano, member of All Saints Church, Pasadena
Video on demand here (Facebook)
Text here

The coronavirus has thrown us all in the mud

By William H. McRaven, Admiral, U.S. Navy (Ret.)
[The Washington Post] My [Navy Seal] training class had been out of the mud for a short period of time when the instructors, looking to weed out the weak of mind and body, ordered the entire group of 55 men back into the bog. The mud consumed each man until there was nothing visible but our heads. We were all exhausted, numb from the cold and desperate to hold on. The instructors told us that we could all leave the mud — if just five men quit. Read more here.

 

Praise Song for the Pandemic

Abbey of the Arts
Text here

 

A prayer in the time of pandemic

God of Love, as we confront the novel coronavirus all around this world, we ask your blessing upon the work of our minds, our hands, and our hearts to keep our minds on those who suffer rather than on our own needs to shelter, to keep our hands working to help rather than to be grab more supplies, to open our hearts to more than just our own families and friends. We know that You are never the source of any suffering in this beautiful world which you have given into our care as the stewards of creation, but rather you are always in the response to suffering, blessing us with the grace to take care of each other in your name and on your behalf. Thank you, Loving God, for all the blessings you give. Amen.  (The Rev. Gary Bradley, retired, former rector of Church of Our Saviour, San Gabriel)

 

COVID-19: A message from global Anglican leadership

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, Bishop Paul Kwong, chair of the Anglican Consultative Council, and Secretary General Josiah-Idowu-Fearon of the Anglican Communion on March 24 wrote a joint letter to the communion about the Covid-19 pandemic, calling on Anglicans and Episcopalians to continue in worship despite the suspension of public worship; to place their trust in God; and to heed the advice of medical professionals and adhere to instructions from their respective political leaders.They also offered prayer resources, including the Anglican Cycle of Prayer, found here.  Read the full letter here.

 

Reaping the Whirlwind

By Walter Brueggemann

[Journal for Preachers] The lingering impact of the virus has summoned our best science to respond to human emergency. That lingering impact has also invited fresh theological consideration. In what follows I will explore some complex interpretive options in the Old Testament concerning the coming of the “plague” that in some way or another, in biblical horizon, is inflected by the reality of God. It is possible to trace out in the Old Testament at least three (maybe more!) interpretive options for such a God-linked reality of the plague. Read more here.

 

Spiritual communion in a season of social distancing

By Ruth A. Meyers

[Church Divinity School of the Pacific] In this time of social distancing, when we cannot come together to celebrate the eucharist, church leaders are introducing creative responses such as packing plastic bags with consecrated wafers for people to drive up and take home, or suggestions that people in disparate places provide their own bread and wine as a presider in another space prays a eucharistic prayer. Such efforts suggest hunger for the body and blood of Christ. Read more here.

 

Stations of the Cross

Created by 8th graders at The Gooden School, Sierra Madre. Click here.

Resources for Virtual and Remote Worship and Meetings

Advice from YouTube for congregations that are streaming services

With the COVID-19 crisis resulting in a mandate to stay home, we know you may be preparing alternative plans for your congregation to celebrate Good Friday and Easter. As you do so, we want to share the tools and resources YouTube has available to offer a potential solution.

Live streaming your service on YouTube is a way for members of your congregation to participate in these holy days, while also practicing physical distancing. Here are some resources that explain how you can easily set up a livestream:

  • Digital Events Playbook – This guide will show you how to create digital-first events, including a walkthrough of our product offering and best practices to engage your community.
  • Detailed Instructions for hosting a livestream event – either from a mobile device or desktop
  • Playlist and Help Center for other best practices across live streaming

Here is information we recommend sending to your congregation on how to easily find and watch your live stream. We recommend sending information in advance and following up with reminders as the holiday approaches.

  • Date and time that the services will be offered
  • Instructions on how to find the livestream :
  • Open a browser (eg Chrome, Firefox, Safari)
  • Go to [insert your YouTube channel link]
  • The live stream will begin on the channel at the time of the service

We understand maintaining a strong community is more important now than ever. We are here to support your efforts. Please reply to yt-nonprofits@google.com with any questions.

Wishing you health and wellness,
YouTube Social Impact Team

This information was sent to members of Episcopal Communicators by Jeremy Tackett of the Episcopal Church Center (New York) communications team. Mike Collins, manager for multimedia services, reached out to YouTube to obtain this playbook.

Introduction to Live Streaming (Diocese of Los Angeles)

 

April 2020: Setting updates for free Zoom accounts and single Pro users

(These new settings are intended to prevent “zoombombing”  – intrusions on Zoom calls by unauthorized people.)

On April 5, 2020, Zoom will enable the Waiting Room feature and two meeting password settings for all Basic users and Pro users with a single license, including K-12 education accounts who have the 40-minute limit temporarily waived. Zoom is enabling two password settings by default: require a password for Personal Meeting ID (PMI) and require a password for meetings which have already been scheduled. These settings are designed to prevent unwanted participants from joining your meeting. Read more here.

 

 Church Publishing offers Book of Common Prayer, other free resources for devotional use

 

You already have everything you need to be a digital media minister

 

Keeping Congregations Connected in the Face of COVID: What we learned from our experiment with online worship
[The Faith X Project]

Keeping Congregations Connected in the Face of COVID: What we learned from our experiment with online worship

 

Live-Streaming Resources for Churches [The Episcopal Diocese of Olympia]

Live-Streaming Resources for Churches

 

 Prayer and Worship in Our Homes

By Keith Anderson,Suzanne Edwards-Acton, Scott Gunn, Christopher Martin, Tim Schenck, Karekin Yarian

 

Connection in the Midst of an Epidemic (from Episcopal Relief & Development)

 

How to prevent ‘Zoombombing’ from disrupting virtual services

By Aysha Khan

[Episcopal News Service/Religion News Service] The mass transition of houses of worship to Zoom and other online video conferencing platforms has meant that religious services are more accessible than ever before. Unfortunately for digital congregants, that means they are also more accessible to online trolls who have plenty of free time to disrupt their services with obscene or hateful interruptions. Read more here.

 

Things to Consider When Holding a Funeral Over Zoom

By Miriam Elizabeth Bledsoe and James Said

Death is a reality in this life. The church and the pastoral office of the Burial Rite have long provided a familiar and comforting container for those in grief to share their sorrow with God and one another, and to mark the life of a loved one. By the rubrics of the Book of Common Prayer, “The service should be held at a time when the congregation has opportunity to be present” (p. 490). However, these are not normal times, and we may be months out from a time when the congregation can gather in person. Here, we offer some thoughts about how we prayed the burial office over Zoom. These suggestions are not binding in any way and priests, pastors and families will need to make decisions based on their own context and a family’s needs. Read more here.

State & County Resources for Addressing Coronavirus Concerns

 

State of California pages

Los Angeles County

Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH, County)
City of Los Angeles
Faith Based Communities

Orange County

CDPH Press Release
OC Health Alert
Mass Gatherings
Workplace

 

Riverside County

Faith Based Communities

San Bernardino County

Faith Based Communities

Resources for Large Community Events & Mass Gatherings

 

Santa Barbara County

Large Events/Mass Gatherings
Faith Based Communities

 

Ventura County

Large Events/Mass Gatherings
At Work

 

CDC website links:

www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/organizations/guidance-community-faith-organizations.html
www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/organizations/checklist.html
www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/organizations/cleaning-disinfection.html

Most counties are referring people to the CDC’s website, the California Department of Public Health for more detailed information or information in general, with some counties having lots of information on their websites, while others have minimal information listed. It seems that most counties are referencing the CDC’s guidelines when it comes to Large Community events and Mass Gatherings, which can be found here.

Additional health resources and information

 

COVID-19 infection rate information

Several websites keep close track of COVID-19 infection and recovery rates.

The County of Los Angeles Internal Services Division has issued a warning that two fake COVID-19 trackers, with the (partial) URLs “corona-virus-map” and “coronavirusapp” contain malicious software. Do not upload anything with these URLs to your computer or phone. In addition, “phishing” emails pretending to be COVID-19-related information or relief organizations are becoming common. Be on your guard.

Fact Checking

Misinformation abounds on the Internet, especially concerning the coronavirus. In this time of uncertainty, it’s important to avoid spreading inaccurate information. Before you share a meme or story, visit one of these well-regarded fact-checking organizations: FactCheck, Snopes, AP Fact Check, PolitoFact (from the Poynter Institute), and FactCheck.org and see if they note any inaccuracies.
Coronavirus Rumor Control (from FEMA – Federal Emergency Management Agency)

“The purpose of this FEMA page is to help the public distinguish between rumors and facts regarding the response to coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Rumors can easily circulate within communities during a crisis. Do your part to the stop the spread of disinformation by doing 3 easy things; don’t believe the rumors, don’t pass them along and go to trusted sources of information to get the facts about the federal (COVID-19) response.” Read more here. (h/t Ken Higginbotham, communications expert at  FEMA and member of St. Stephen’s Church, Santa Clarita.)

The [COVID-19] Risks – Know Them – Avoid Them

By Erin Bromage

[Blog] When you think of outbreak clusters, what are the big ones that come to mind? Most people would go to the cruise ships. But you would be wrong. Ship outbreaks don’t even land in the top 50 outbreaks to date. The biggest outbreaks are in prisons, religious ceremonies, and workplaces, such a meat packing facilities and call centers. Any environment that is enclosed, with poor air circulation and high density of people, spells trouble.

Read more here.

Erin Bromage holds a doctorate in immunology and microbiology. She teaches and researches infectious diseases at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire.

 

Helpful Information in Understanding SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19

A history of the SARS coronavirus, its most recent version SARS-CoV-2, and the resulting disease, COVID-19, with some recommendations for prevention, especially in church settings. Written March 5 by Anjeanette (A.J.) Roberts, Ph.D., microbiologist, former researcher with the National Institute of Health, and member of Grace Episcopal Church, Glendora. Read more here. An updated (March 15) version is here.

Hannah Palpant, Ph.D., also a member of Grace Church, has conducted several interviews with Dr. Roberts concerning the history of the virus, its present form, and how to effectively protect against it.

 

PSA: Safe Grocery Shopping in COVID-19 Pandemic

A medical doctor shows how to use “sterile techniques” to help prevent infection when dealing with groceries from the market or takeout food. Video is here.

 

The Covid19 pandemic: A slow-moving disaster

A blog post by Dr. Lucy Jones, for more than three decades a seismologist with the US Geological Survey. She is a member of All Saints Church, Pasadena.

I am not an epidemiologist. But you don’t need to know the details of how the virus works, to understand the public health statistics. I am an educated layperson with more than four decades experience in statistics, and from that perspective, I want to share my thoughts on what we are going through and how to listen to the public health professionals. As a disaster scientist, I also look at what we should expect going forward. Read more here.

 

Why outbreaks like coronavirus spread exponentially, and how to “flatten the curve”

[The Washington Post – March 14) After the first case of covid-19, the disease caused by the new strain of coronavirus, was announced in the United States, reports of further infections trickled in slowly. Two months later, that trickle has turned into a steady current. This so-called exponential curve has experts worried. If the number of cases were to continue to double every three days, there would be about a hundred million cases in the United States by May. Read more here.

 

 Doxology Handwashing Timer

[Diocese of Newark, New Jersey] In order to protect against flu and coronavirus, it’s recommended to wash your hands for at least 20 seconds – the length of time it takes to sing “Happy Birthday” twice. If you get tired of singing that, you can also sing the Doxology! Here’s a demonstration by Emma Moyer (soprano), Vivienne Longstreet (alto), Roy DeMarco (tenor) and William Butron (bass), students at Westminster Choir College and choir section leaders at St. George’s Episcopal Church in Maplewood, NJ. Video by Nina Nicholson, director of communications for the Diocese of Newark. Video is here.

 

Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives

[CDC – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] Handwashing can help prevent illness. It involves five simple and effective steps (Wet, Lather, Scrub, Rinse, Dry) you can take to reduce the spread of diarrheal and respiratory illness so you can stay healthy. Regular handwashing, particularly before and after certain activities, is one of the best ways to remove germs, avoid getting sick, and prevent the spread of germs to others. It’s quick, it’s simple, and it can keep us all from getting sick. Handwashing is a win for everyone, except the germs. Video is here.

 

AB’s Hand Washing Demo: No Cleaver!

Funny and informative hand-washing advice from Alton Brown, creator and host of the Food Network television show Good Eats. Video is here.

 

6 Kaiser Permanente medical offices in Orange County temporarily close

Kaiser Permanente Orange County has temporarily closed six medical office buildings, according to a release from the healthcare company shared with the diocese by Church Pension Group. “These measures are being enacted to ensure we have capacity and equipment to care for the more critically ill patients, and to guide members to telehealth options,” Kaiser’s announcement said. The shuttered offices are:

Aliso Viejo Medical Offices
Anaheim Hills Medical Offices
Foothill Ranch Medical Offices
La Habra Medical Offices
San Juan Capistrano Medical Offices
Yorba Linda Offices

Members who were scheduled for appointments have been notified. Both Orange county urgent care locations remain open. For further information, call Kaiser Member Services.

 

Social distancing may have helped California slow the virus and avoid New York’s fate

[Los Angeles Times – March 31] For California and Washington, the coronavirus triggers came early. They pushed the two Western states to social distancing measures earlier than the rest of the country. … [E]xperts are looking to California and Washington for signs that social distancing is making a difference. Read more here.

 

The Phases of Disaster: Reflections from President Jennings

By Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies

During the last twenty years, I have served as a critical incident stress debriefer for emergency service workers and clergy in disaster zones, and I have seen firsthand how those experiences change physical, social, emotional and spiritual landscapes dramatically. I am not an expert in disaster response and recovery, but I have studied the dynamics inherent in disaster situations and served with first responders, mental health professionals, social scientists, and people who have lived through disasters. Read more here.

 

Science-based wellness and meditation app available

The Los Angeles Department of Mental Health has recommended a mindfulness and meditation web app titled “Headspace” that provides science-backed guided meditations in English and Spanish, as well as workout videos, sleep exercises, and helpful information to manage stress and anxiety. Los Angeles County residents can sign up for a free membership: click here.  H/t the Rev. Alexandra Conrads

Church music during the pandemic

NATS panel of experts lays out sobering future for singers: ‘No vaccine, no safe public singing’

On May 5, an expert panel assembled by the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS), the American Choral Directors Association (ACDA), Chorus America, the Barbershop Harmony Society, and the Performing Arts Medical Association (PAMA) laid out a sobering vision for the future of public singing in America. The primary goal of the panel, according to NATS Executive Director Dr. Allen Henderson, was “to bring scientists and medical professionals directly to our audience, as those of us who run professional organizations do not have the direct knowledge ourselves of these complex issues.” In a presentation that sent shockwaves through the singing community, Dr. Lucinda Halstead, the president of the Performing Arts Medical Association and the Medical Director of the Department of Otolaryngology at the University of South Carolina, concluded that there is no safe way for singers to rehearse together until there is a COVID-19 vaccine and a 95% effective treatment in place, in her estimates at least 18-24 months away. Read more here.

Stewardship

Credit Union will make loans available to churches, institutions at reduced rate during coronavirus crisis

The Episcopal Community Federal Credit Union has set aside a $500,000 emergency cash fund to assist churches and other institutions of the diocese whose cash flow has been adversely impacted by circumstances caused by the Covid-19 virus pandemic. The program will offer, for a limited time, a 50% reduction to its published rate for church loans. Read more here. Esta historia aparece en español después del texto en inglés.

Why Giving to Your Church Right Now Might Be More Important than Ever

By Erik Cooper

[Stone Table] Keep giving to your local church. Perhaps I’m the right one to say this as I have no direct personal upside from the conversation. What I do have is a deep belief in God’s Word, a love for the mission of God in the world, and a network of dear friends leading this charge in countries across the globe and in local congregations right here in my own community. While I don’t draw a paycheck from a church, I love the local Church and believe it is God’s plan to embody and proclaim His Kingdom to the world. We can debate its many forms and expressions, whether it’s a building, an organization, or just the people, but there’s one thing I don’t think should be debatable for Christians today: when we honor the Church we’re honoring God. Read more here.

Coping with social distancing

 

Zoom exhaustion is real. Here are six ways to find balance and stay connected

By Steven Hickman, Psy.D.
[Mindful – April 6, 2020] There is a different quality to our attention when we are online. We are hyper-focused on the few available visual cues that we normally gather from a full range of available body language. Or perhaps, we are totally distracted and checking email while we are supposed to be conversing or listening intently to a colleague’s detailed presentation. If we are with several people online at the same time, we are simultaneously processing visual cues from all of those people (and perhaps a handful of their pets and children too!) in a way we never have to do around a conference table. It is a stimulus-rich environment, but just like rich desserts, sometimes too rich is just too much. Read more here. (h/t Canon to the Ordinary Melissa McCarthy)

Using Zoom to connect with friends

From Bishop Suffragan Diane Jardine Bruce: “Friends of ours were on the phone with us and suggested we get together via Zoom for an hour. We scheduled that, made snacks and ‘shared’ our time together. We checked in. We laughed. We ‘showed’ each other pictures of our grandchildren. My best friend learned of this and she set us up for a social hour with she and her husband for this Friday. It’s a great way to be with friends and family. (Posted in Resource Roundup March 26)

10 guidelines for pastoral care during the coronavirus outbreak

[The Christian Century] Officials are arguing over whether the novel coronavirus has reached the level of pandemic, as outbreaks continue to spread globally. Meanwhile, religious leaders still must care for people—many of whom are feeling a rise in anxiety verging on panic. How can ministers, chaplains, counselors, and educators accompany people pastorally through this valley of anxiety, fear, and death? Read more here.

COVID-19: Addressing isolation and quarantine

A summary of this Episcopal Relief & Development webcast is here.

New York Public Library releases app allowing access to ‘growing’ e-book collection

[New York Daily News] The New York Public Library is turning a page — and taking a step into the digital age. The library is releasing an app Tuesday that will allow readers to easily access its popular e-book collection. More than 300,000 e-books will be available on the app — dubbed “SimplyE” — to anyone who has a library card and access to either an iOS or Android device. Kindle and web browser versions are in development, according to the library. Read more here.

I’m a nun and I’ve been social distancing for 29 years. Here are tips for staying home amid coronavirus fears.

By Sister Mary Catharine Perry, as told to Cassidy Grom
[NJ.com] For the past 29 years, I’ve chosen to practice social distancing. Of course, I and the 17 other nuns I live with don’t call it that. We are formally called cloistered sisters, meaning we never leave our walled-off monastery in Summit except for doctors’ visits or perhaps shopping for a specific item. … Of course, this virus is not good. Sickness never is. And I understand that this sudden shift in our society is frightening. As someone who has lived a life of separation, I’d like to share from my experience how you can make the best of it. Read more here.

‘I’m Really Isolated Now’: When Elders Have to Fight Coronavirus Alone

[The New York Times] At the Stanley M. Isaacs Neighborhood Center on Manhattan’s Upper East Side on Monday morning, a trickle of older New Yorkers, some pushing walkers or riding in mobility scooters, arrived to bad news. All group activities were canceled. Read more here.

Google now lets you explore U.S. National Parks via 360-degree virtual tours

[TechCrunch] Exploring the world is something that’s always been a bit of a luxury for those who can afford to travel, but technology is changing that. With VR and 360-degree videos, you can now immerse yourself in virtual environments that give you a real sense of what a place is like, without actually being there. Read more here.

Is it safe to hike, run and bike outside now?

[Los Angeles Times – March 18] Is it safe to walk, run, hike and bike outside? Is it recommended? Yes, say L.A. County Public Health officials. In fact, “take a walk” and “go for a hike” are at the top of the L.A. County Public Health Department’s “safe-to-do” list as the region’s fight against the coronavirus continues. And, a spokesman said, “Biking and running are great as long as not in a group where there is close contact.” Read more here.

10 Ways to Ease Your Coronavirus Anxiety

[The New York Times – March 18] Dr. Harriet Lerner has spent much of her career researching the effects of anxiety and fear on individuals, families and larger systems. She has also managed anxiety in her own life (documented in her best seller “The Dance of Fear”). That makes her the perfect person to help us tackle the rise in panic accompanying Covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. Read more here.

Children and Families

 

Making an Altar for Home

By Sharon Ely Pearson

We have experienced that the Church is not a building but a community gathered in prayer. We’ve also realized that our homes can also be places of prayer. So as we near the end of our Lenten journey and prepare for Holy Week, perhaps it’s time to create a prayer space at home that is available anytime of day or night to anyone in your household. In the midst of the chaos of homeschooling and worries of this world right now, working together as a household to build a home altar or sacred space may be an excellent way to create order and peace. Read more here. (From the Resource Roundup for March 26: h/t The Rev. Susan Bek, rector of St. Paul’s Church, Ventura.)

 

Confirmed List of 60 LAUSD Schools That Will Be Serving Free Meals to Students in L.A.

[L.A. Taco – March 16] L.A. Taco has confirmed that starting Wednesday, 60 schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District will be serving free meals to students from the hours of 7 to 10 AM.  Read more here.

 

Stuck at Home? These 12 Famous Museums Offer Virtual Tours You Can Take on Your Couch

[Parents Magazine] There is a way to get a little culture and education while you’re confined to your home. According to Fast Company, Google Arts & Culture teamed up with over 500 museums and galleries around the world to bring anyone and everyone virtual tours and online exhibits of some of the most famous museums around the world. Read more here.

 

Scholastic Learn at Home: Day-by-day projects to keep kids reading, thinking, and growing

Even when schools are closed, you can keep the learning going with these special cross-curricular journeys. Every day includes four separate learning experiences, each built around a thrilling, meaningful story or video. Kids can do them on their own, with their families, or with their teachers. Just find your grade level and let the learning begin! Read more here.

 

Just For Kids: A Comic Exploring The New Coronavirus

Download here

 

Harry the Dirty Dog

Read by Betty White. Video is here.

 

Bestselling children’s author Mo Willems is teaching drawing on YouTube to kids who are stuck at home due to the coronavirus

[Insider – March 18] For parents who are desperate to keep their kids entertained and learning while they’re home from school due to the coronavirus outbreak, Mo Willems, a bestselling author and illustrator, is here to help. Read more here.

Recovery resources

Online Group AA Meetings

“The only requirement for member in Alcoholics Anonymous is a desire to stop drinking” Open to the public; online registration and sign=in is required. Click here.

Online Intergroup, Alcoholics Anonymous

Online Meetings Directory: AA Groups for men, women, GLBT, deaf/hard of hearing, blind and visually impaired, other groups. Click here.

How Zoom Is Keeping Me Sober

By Molly Jong-Fast
[Vogue – March 18] “I’m happy to be social distancing. I want to stop the spread. I’ve seen the pictures of Italy and I know we’re just a few days from that terrifying reality. But there’s one problem with all of this. I am a recovering alcoholic. I’ve been sober since I was 19. I even wrote a novel about it. And while I’ve been sober since November 2, 1997—22 years—I stay sober largely by going to meetings. So how am I and everyone else in AA (about 2.1 million members) going to stay sober in a world without AA meetings?” Read more here.

Managing work in a time of isolation

Remote Working: Setting Yourself and Your Teams Up for Success

LinkedIn is making this content available for free. Read more here.

How to help

Can you sew? Hospitals, other agencies need face masks for medical providers, patients, at-risk elderly

The Rev. Canon Jaime Edwards-Acton, rector of St. Stephen’s Church, Hollywood, and pastor of St. Be’s (St. Barnabas), Eagle Rock, writes, “A friend and parishioner of mine who is a nurse practitioner has been deployed on the front lines in the San Francisco area to deal with COVID19. She said she and her colleagues have no protective masks for their patients. She asked me if the saints of my church could sew some. After thanking her for everything she does, I said: Yes, we can!” And I bet a group of my friends and colleagues, real and virtual, can do it too.”

Edwards-Acton is compiling a list of places that can use such masks and how to send them. The nurse-practitioner has told him that she sees an urgent need for masks not only for health care professionals, but for the elderly in general, nursing homes and smaller hospital systems. She adds that bigger hospital systems may need them too.

An article from the Courier-Press of Evanstown, Indiana, contains information and links to instructions, patterns and a video: click here.

If you would like to help, please click here to notify Edwards-Acton that you are available.

 

Thank you cards for hospital staff: a request from Michael Bell of Good Samaritan Hospital

Church colleagues, friends with kids stuck at home, educators with classes online, leaders of other groups – If you’re looking for something helpful to do right now that doesn’t cost much more than time and some creative love, consider writing/creating thank-you notes, cards, pictures, banners for our hospital staff. E.g., “Thank you, Good Samaritans” – signed by you, children, students, members of your club or community. The more the better. Imagine how you’d feel – how your spirit would be nourished  if you saw hundreds or thousands of thank-you notes greeting you as you face another challenging day at the hospital during this crisis. Package them up and mail them to my attention (see below). I’ll get them posted around the hospital to help boost the spirits of our staff who are and will be working round the clock throughout this COVID-19 pandemic for the well being of our neighbors here in downtown Los Angeles.

Blessing to all for safety and wellness at this time. Thanks to all who act on this invitation.

The Rev. Michael S. Bell
Spiritual Care Services
PIH Health Good Samaritan Hospital
1225 Wilshire Blvd
Los Angeles CA 90017

 

Episcopal Relief & Development COVID-19 Response Fund

“Join us in prayer and action. Help us be there in times of uncertainty. Your gift enables us to prepare for emergencies around the world — including the recent outbreak of the coronavirus. With your help, we can equip our partners on the ground with crucial support to assist local communities and meet the changing needs as this crisis unfolds.” Click here to contribute.

 

How you can help during the coronavirus outbreak

[The Washington Post – March 21] The coronavirus pandemic has now reached every state in the United States. In addition to posing public health challenges, the outbreak has prompted mass closures of schools and businesses and is straining resources. Here are ways to help in your community. Read more here.